What Face Shields Do?

Face Shield

We talk a lot about eye safety and eye protection when dealing with hazards like sparks, debris, or splashing chemicals, and focus on safety glasses and goggles as an important part of our personal protective equipment (PPE). This makes sense – our eyes are easily damaged, and becoming blinded from a work injury has significant repercussions for the injured employee and for the employer.

In our focus on protecting our eyes, though, let’s not lose sight of the fact that more than just our eyes need to be, and can be, protected. Many tasks require the use of face shields too. They provide additional protection for our eyes, and protect the rest of our face as well. With that said, there are some things that we need to understand about what face shields can and cannot do.

When properly used as part of a workplace injury prevention program, face shields provide additional protection against some impact hazards, or things flying into our faces. Do pay attention to the word ‘additional,’ though; when used on their own, OSHA does not consider face shields to be adequate  protection for impact hazards like flying fragments or objects, large chips, or particles.

To adequately protect an employee from those hazards, a face shield must be used with safety glasses or safety goggles. That’s right – 2 layers of protection. And if you think about it, it seems reasonable – the face shield can slow or even stop a flying hazard before it even reaches your glasses, which are within an inch of your eye. That’s a little close for comfort. A big part of why a face shield isn’t enough on its own, though, is that it doesn’t sit as close to your face or eyes, and so there is still potential for something to fly under the shield and injure your eyes. When combined with safety glasses or goggles, a face shield provides an important additional layer of protection not just for your eyes, but also protects the rest of your face from burns, cuts, or even exposures to toxic or caustic chemicals.

Selecting Face Shields

Like other PPE, we need to select the right face shield for the task at hand. To do so, we need to understand what options are available, what kind of protection is required, and how it will interact with other required PPE used for workplace injury prevention.

One of the most important decisions comes down to selecting the right type of window (also called a visor) on the face shield. Many are available in different types of plastic or plastic-like materials. These often provide excellent visibility for the worker, are usually lightweight (reducing the strain on the worker’s head and neck), and can even be ANSI rated for impact protection.

The materials don’t all function the same, though. Some of these materials are more scratch resistant than others. Some provide adequate protection against specific chemical exposures, whereas others may provide none, or worse, might interact with specific chemicals in dangerous ways. Keep that in mind when selecting face shields to protect against chemical splashes, and make sure to consult your safety data sheets for the chemicals that you use to make sure that your face shields are made of the right materials.

Plastic or plastic-like materials aren’t necessary, or even ideal, for all tasks though. Steel and nylon mesh windows are also available, protecting workers against impacts from larger objects. They won’t provide the same level of protection against dusts, fumes, and vapors, though, as they do not form a solid shield, allowing dusts and vapors to pass through the mesh. That same mesh design allows for even greater airflow for the worker, which can be particularly useful when working outside in the heat.

Other required PPE can also affect what types of face shields are appropriate. One common type is attaches to hard hats, allowing employees to  wear adequate head protection. When hard hats are not required, face shields are also available as adjustable headgear. Decisions on which type to use will depend on your PPE assessment, which makes it essential that a thorough analysis is performed so that employees have adequate PPE for workplace injury prevention, so that using face shields does not expose them to additional hazards.

What is Corona Virus

Now, the world is being horrendous with a disease caused by the corona virus.

Everyone is busy looking for masks, hand sanitizers and other protective devices in order to protect themselves from the virus.

Before this action, it better for us to find out about what is the corona virus.

Corona viruses are a family of viruses known for containing strains that cause potentially deadly diseases in mammals and birds. In humans they’re typically spread via airborne droplets of fluid produced by infected individuals. Some rare but notable strains, including Wuhan coronavirus (2019-nCoV), and those responsible for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), can cause death in humans.

First described in detail in the 1960s, the coronavirus gets its name from a distinctive corona or that projects from the envelope surrounding the particle. Encoding the virus’s make-up is the longest genome of any RNA-based virus – a single strand of nucleic acid roughly 26,000 to 32,000 bases long.

There are four known genuses in the family, named AlphacoronavirusBetacoronavirusGammacoronavirus, and Deltacoronavirus. The first two only infect mammals, including bats, pigs, cats, and humans. Gammacoronavirus mostly infects birds such as poultry, while Deltacoronavirus can infect both birds and mammals.

Coronaviruses are zoonotic, meaning they are transmitted between animals and people.  Detailed investigations found that SARS-CoV was transmitted from civet cats to humans and MERS-CoV from dromedary camels to humans. Several known coronaviruses are circulating in animals that have not yet infected humans.

Common signs of infection include respiratory symptoms, fever, cough, shortness of breath and breathing difficulties. In more severe cases, infection can cause pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure and even death.

Standard recommendations to prevent infection spread include regular hand washing, covering mouth and nose when coughing and sneezing, thoroughly cooking meat and eggs. Avoid close contact with anyone showing symptoms of respiratory illness such as coughing and sneezing.

What are the symptoms of a coronavirus?

Unlike MERS and SARS, the Wuhan coronavirus is usually fairly mild. It can take longer for symptoms to develop. Symptoms may include:

  • A mild cough.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • A runny nose.
  • A sore throat.
  • A headache.
  • A fever.

So far, only 15 to 20% of cases have become severe. Those with weakened immune systems may develop more serious symptoms, like pneumonia or bronchitis. So far, only people 40 years old and older have developed the Wuhan coronavirus infection.

What causes a coronavirus?

Humans first get a coronavirus from contact with animals.  Then, it can spread from human to human. Health officials do not know what animal caused the Wuhan coronavirus. The Wuhan coronavirus can be spread when one human comes into contact with an infected person’s bodily fluids, such as droplets in a cough.  It might also be caused by touching something an infected person has touched and then touching your hand to your mouth, nose, or eyes.

How is a coronavirus diagnosed?

If you believe you may have a coronavirus, you should see your doctor immediately. Before just showing up to your doctor’s office, alert your doctor that you’re coming and why. This will allow the office to prepare and perhaps isolate patients to prevent the spread of infection. To diagnose you, your doctor will run tests to rule out other common infections.

 

Love Your Eyes

There are four things you can do to protect your eyes from injury:

  1. Know the eye safety dangers at your work.
  2. Eliminate hazards before starting work by using machine guards, work screens or other engineering controls.
  3. Use proper eye protection.
  4. Keep your safety eyewear in good condition and have it replaced if it becomes damaged.

Selection of protective eyewear appropriate for a given task should be made based on a hazard assessment of each activity. Types of eye protection include:

  • Non-prescription and prescription safety glasses — Although safety glasses may look like normal dress eyewear, they are designed to provide significantly more eye protection. They have lenses and frames that are much stronger than regular eyeglasses. Safety glasses must meet standards of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Look for the Z87 mark on the lens or frame. Safety glasses provide eye protection for general working conditions where there may be dust, chips or flying particles. Additional side protection can be provided by the use of side shields and wraparound-style safety glasses. Safety lenses are available in glass, plastic, polycarbonate and Trivex™ materials. While all four types must meet or exceed the minimum requirements for protecting your eyes, polycarbonate lenses provide the highest level of protection from impact.
  • Goggles — Goggles provide impact, dust and chemical splash protection. Like safety glasses, safety goggles are highly impact resistant. In addition, they provide a secure shield around the entire eye and protect against hazards coming from any direction. Goggles can be worn over prescription glasses and contact lenses to provide protection from flying objects and chemical splashes and in dusty environments.
  • Face shields and helmets — Full face shields are used to protect workers exposed to chemicals, heat, or bloodborne pathogens. Helmets are used for welding or working with molten materials. Face shields and helmets should not be used as the sole means of protective eyewear. They need to be used in conjunction with safety glasses or goggles. Wearing safety glasses or goggles under face shields also provides protection when the shield is lifted.
  • Special protection — Other types of protection, such as helmets or goggles with special filters to protect the eyes from optical radiation exposure, should be used for tasks such as welding or working with lasers.

One way to ensure that safety glasses provide adequate protection is to be sure they fit properly. Also, eye protection devices must be properly maintained. Scratched and dirty devices reduce vision, cause glare and may contribute to accidents.

Protective eyewear works best when you know how to use it properly. Combined with machine guards, screened or divided work stations, and other engineering controls, using the correct protective eyewear can help keep you safe from any type of eye hazard.